Departmental Bulletin Paper ポストスハルト期におけるインドネシア華人のアイデンティティ : スラバヤでのインタビュー調査より
Ethnic Identity Among Chinese Indonesians in the Post-Suharto Era : Study Based on Interview Surveys in Surabaya

中谷, 潤子

Description
This study considers ethnic Chinese identity in Indonesia following the collapse of the Suharto regime in 1998. Until now, there has been no common denominator for either passing on the Chinese language, or being aware of one's identity as an Indonesian ethnic Chinese. This demonstrates identity to be something transformed in response to differing interactions and negotiations between setting, circumstances, people, and society. In the present situation after ethnic Chinese have regained cultural freedom and control over language use, we were able to conduct interviews with eleven Chinese Indonesians in 2013, who were raised as members of the post-Suharto generation and were likely to understand the changes brought about on ethnic Chinese identity. The results did not show that clear changes in identity had resulted from the era transition or between generations. While the informants clearly understood their Chinese ethnicity in the context of the historical era shifts, they also expressed pride at being ethnically Chinese, which strengthened in response to the trauma of the preexisting discrimination that has continued. Moreover, the pressure to integrate, to be an "Indonesian," and the contrasting awareness that accompanies their prioritization of not to be pribumi, but rather ethnic Chinese, are seen to coexist.
This study considers ethnic Chinese identity in Indonesia following the collapse of the Suharto regime in 1998. Until now, there has been no common denominator for either passing on the Chinese language, or being aware of one's identity as an Indonesian ethnic Chinese. This demonstrates identity to be something transformed in response to differing interactions and negotiations between setting, circumstances, people, and society. In the present situation after ethnic Chinese have regained cultural freedom and control over language use, we were able to conduct interviews with eleven Chinese Indonesians in 2013, who were raised as members of the post-Suharto generation and were likely to understand the changes brought about on ethnic Chinese identity. The results did not show that clear changes in identity had resulted from the era transition or between generations. While the informants clearly understood their Chinese ethnicity in the context of the historical era shifts, they also expressed pride at being ethnically Chinese, which strengthened in response to the trauma of the preexisting discrimination that has continued. Moreover, the pressure to integrate, to be an "Indonesian," and the contrasting awareness that accompanies their prioritization of not to be pribumi, but rather ethnic Chinese, are seen to coexist.
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