Departmental Bulletin Paper 実践女子大学図書館蔵 下田歌子自筆日記について(三) 明治二十三年の概要
Findings from Utako Shimoda’s Handwritten Diaries – Property of the Jissen Women’s University Library (3) – Summary of Material in 1890 –

愛甲, 晴美

Description
 This is the third part of the survey about Utako Shimoda’s Handwritten Diary. This report introduces the diaries written from January to December, 1890 (Material of Utako Shimoda No. 32). This report makes a survey of Shimoda’s movements from the diaries and explains about some important events. The diaries were written from January 1st to december 31st, and contain pages that seem to be about her daily schedule written with a pencil between 28th and 29th of November and on the last page of the diaries. In January 1890, Princess Fusako of Kanenomiya, the seventh daughter of Meiji Emperor, was born; Shimoda later became her tutor. In June, the regulation for the officers in Peer Women’s School was changed. Shimoda traveled to Nikko during August 1st to 14th, and the description of the diaries indicates that she wrote a separate travel diary. In the first volume of Kosetsusosho, there is writing about travel in Nikko in 1890, but in the writing there is a description “November 4th”, which is in contradiction with the diaries. It seems that she often became unwell from the beginning of the year, and she took exercise to train her body since the summer holiday of this year.The Imperial Rescript on Education was promulgated in October and the first Opening Ceremony of the Imperial Diet was held in November. During this period an epidemic of cholera occurred. It is notable that Shimoda learned about the situation of Japanese ladies in Hawaii in November and she wrote that it was terrible. She also wrote that she decided to start education for women who were not in the privileged class and this is important evidence that indicates a new direction of her education work. This report verified Shimoda’s busy year through the diaries and related materials, in which she made efforts to improve the Peer Women’s School, met many people, taught students in Toyo-juku, and learned a lot by herself. The report shows that Shimoda decided to start education for women not in the privileged class. I would like to investigate how she confirmed her determination and realized this work.
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