Departmental Bulletin Paper Hunting Techniques, Wildlife Offtake and Market Integration. A Perspective from Individual Variations among the Baka (Cameroon)

DUDA, Romain  ,  GALLOIS, Sandrine  ,  REYES-GARCIA, Victoria

38 ( 2 )  , pp.97 - 118 , 2017-06 , The Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University
ISSN:0285-1601
NCID:AA10626444
Description
Hunting is a main threat for wildlife conservation in Central Africa, but remains an essential component of local people’s livelihoods. Research suggests that hunters engage in hunting in different ways, especially according to various technical means, which might potentially have differentiated impacts on wildlife. Using quantitative data collected over a 12 months period, we analyse different hunter’s profiles among the Baka of Southeastern Cameroon, and compare socio-economic and hunting offtake data across profiles. We monitored 719 hunting events, recording 579 catches (belonging to 32 species). Most Baka hunters engage in snare trapping, a relatively low-efficiency hunting technique, while a reduced number of Baka hunters use firearms. Firearm users obtain the highest offtake and sell most of it. This study therefore suggests the emergence of specialized hunters in shotgun hunting with a higher integration in market economy. Disentangling the effects of hunting techniques and their relations to socio-economic status might help design wildlife management strategies that take into consideration the diversity and the complexity of practices among local populations.
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http://repository.kulib.kyoto-u.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/2433/225259/1/ASM_38%282%29_97.pdf

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