Departmental Bulletin Paper Spain according to American Literature in the Seventeenth to the Nineteenth Centuries : a History of Love and Hate.
Spain according to American Literature in the Seventeenth to the Nineteenth Centuries : a History of Love and Hate.

GARCIA ARROYO, Jorge

Description
The concept of a reactionary and religiously fanatic Spain was often used in American Literature. The negative image of Spain in America was originated by the so-called Black Legend, a campaign of discrediting the Spanish Empire orchestrated by its enemies, England and Flanders in the sixteenth century. The Black Legend created a Hispanophobic tradition in England which was transmitted to its colonies in America. Nevertheless, the image of Spain in American literature was not totally negative. For although the Spaniards did not have good propaganda in the colonies during the seventeenth and part of the eighteenth centuries, it is certain that a romantic vision of Spain rose in the nineteenth century American literature, driven by a much larger number of American travelers to that country and the rediscovery of Spanish literary classics, and embodied in works by such figures as Washington Irving, William Prescott, Henry Longfellow and William Dean Howells. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate through the image of Spain constructed by American Literature that the emotional and cultural relations between both countries were very deep and that the feeling of enmity did not prevail so much.
Full-Text

https://ir.kagoshima-u.ac.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=14172&item_no=1&attribute_id=16&file_no=1

Number of accesses :  

Other information