Journal Article Influence of family history on the willingness of outpatients to undergo genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension: a cross-sectional study

Takeshima, Taro  ,  Okayama, Masanobu  ,  Ae, Ryusuke  ,  Harada, Masanori  ,  Kajii, Eiji

7 ( 7 )  , p.e016322 , 2017-07 , BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2044605520446055
Description
Objectives It is unclear whether family medical history influences the willingness to undergo genetic testing. This study aimed to determine how family history affected the willingness to undergo genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension in patients with and without hypertension. Design Cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire. Setting Six primary care clinics and hospitals in Japan. Participants Consecutive 1705 outpatients aged >20 years, 578 of whom had hypertension. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome variable was the willingness to undergo genetic testing to determine the risk of salt-sensitive hypertension, and the secondary variables were age, sex, education level, family history and concerns about hypertension. Factors associated with a willingness to undergo genetic testing were evaluated in patients with and without hypertension using a logistic regression model. Results In the hypertension and non-hypertension groups, 323 (55.9%) and 509 patients (45.2%), respectively, were willing to undergo genetic testing. This willingness was related with a high level of education (adjusted OR (ad-OR): 1.81, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.93), family history of stroke (1.55, 1.04 to 2.31) and concerns about hypertension (2.04, 1.27 to 3.28) in the hypertension group, whereas in the non-hypertension group, it was influenced by education level (ad-OR: 1.45, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.86), family history of hypertension (1.52, 1.17 to 1.98) and concerns about hypertension (2.03, 1.53 to 2.68). Conclusions The influence of family history on the willingness to undergo genetic testing for risk of salt-sensitivity hypertension differed between participants with and without hypertension. In particular, participants without hypertension wished to know their likelihood of developing hypertension, whereas those with hypertension were interested to know the risk of stroke (a complication of hypertension). Family history could help better counsel patients about genetic testing on the basis of their medical history.
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