Thesis or Dissertation 電力系統に対応したバイオガス発電施設併設型畜舎における電力需給の平準化に関する研究

石川, 志保

2015-09-25
Description
Mechanization of livestock farming industries has helped to free farmers from long hours of work. However, the focus of these industries also underwent a shift to energy-intensive practices due, in part, to long-term low and stable energy prices of fossil fuel. After the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, the importance of decentralized energy systems, sustainable renewable energy use, and the resulting savings in costs were recognized anew. This paper discussed electricity supply-demand leveling on livestock barn with biogas power generation facility (BGP) in electric power system. In order to consider the potential for electricity supply from a BGP located adjacent to a livestock barn, I inspected the power consumption leveling in a livestock barn. The objective of second chapter was to compare a barn with BGP with a centralized BGP system totally from the energy and economic point of view. Third chapter of this paper, in the barn, electricity necessary for the management of livestock and the barn itself was self-supplied via biogas power generation alone, and as much surplus power as possible was sold to other power users. In fourth chapter, power demand leveling technologies were evaluated through the adjustment of electrical equipment operating times based on the results of a measurement survey on livestock feeding management system electricity usage. Additionally, I determined the effects of power demand leveling on power consumption by using simulation. In fifth chapter, the power balance for the barn with BGP was verified using simulation and actual measurement to assess the potential for electricity supply from the plant. It was shown that the barn with BGP was the power supply which did not depend on the feed-in tariff (FIT) scheme for renewable energy (RE) power sources. Additionally, this result demonstrated the potential of using BGPs as a small-scale distributed power station in a rural area.
Mechanization of livestock farming industries has helped to free farmers from long hours of work. However, the focus of these industries also underwent a shift to energy-intensive practices due, in part, to long-term low and stable energy prices of fossil fuel. After the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, the importance of decentralized energy systems, sustainable renewable energy use, and the resulting savings in costs were recognized anew. This paper discussed electricity supply-demand leveling on livestock barn with biogas power generation facility (BGP) in electric power system. In order to consider the potential for electricity supply from a BGP located adjacent to a livestock barn, I inspected the power consumption leveling in a livestock barn. The objective of second chapter was to compare a barn with BGP with a centralized BGP system totally from the energy and economic point of view. Third chapter of this paper, in the barn, electricity necessary for the management of livestock and the barn itself was self-supplied via biogas power generation alone, and as much surplus power as possible was sold to other power users. In fourth chapter, power demand leveling technologies were evaluated through the adjustment of electrical equipment operating times based on the results of a measurement survey on livestock feeding management system electricity usage. Additionally, I determined the effects of power demand leveling on power consumption by using simulation. In fifth chapter, the power balance for the barn with BGP was verified using simulation and actual measurement to assess the potential for electricity supply from the plant. It was shown that the barn with BGP was the power supply which did not depend on the feed-in tariff (FIT) scheme for renewable energy (RE) power sources. Additionally, this result demonstrated the potential of using BGPs as a small-scale distributed power station in a rural area.
iii, 89p.
Hokkaido University(北海道大学). 博士(農学)
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http://eprints.lib.hokudai.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/2115/60068/1/Shiho_Ishikawa.pdf

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